Tracey Emin

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

There must be people still alive who believe that art should have some universal aura around it, that the greatness of a Rembrandt self-portrait, for example, lies in what it tells us about ourselves, or the world, or old-age, rather than merely Rembrandt himself and the state of his face or his feelings. Well, those people are in for a shock, because Tracey Emin is coming towards them in all her glory, ego all over her face.

Robin Rhode

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

In 1975 when General Franco died there were no graffiti on the walls of Spanish cities. They were clean, dead old spaces. And then it began. It was often done for fun as a way of disturbing the peace. Running away was often the best part.

Matthew Barney

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

When writers watch artists, they shake their heads in envy. Artists have more fun, more money, sweeter partners and longer orgasms. They look like rock stars. They seem to work just once in a while. And they can do whatever comes into their heads. A writer needs thousands of readers, maybe hundreds of thousands. An artist needs merely two or three curators and two or three critics - the fewer the better sometimes - to become famous and free.

Martin Creed

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

What are we going to do about ordinary life? It is always out there demanding our attention in tones sometimes muffled, sometimes shrill. Most artists wish it would just go away so they can get on with framing and hanging up little squares of painted canvas, or producing nice mysterious videos, or making pieces of abstract sculpture, or inventing strange mad installations.
Martin Creed is unusual in that ordinary life interests him. Now that his collected works have finally appeared in book form, it might be worth trying to define what he does.

Louise Bourgeois

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

Louise Bourgeois is the sort of artist every curator wants to have and to hold; the objects she conjures up with such skill and steely, creepy passion draw large crowds. They stay in your dreams. You can put her work outside like a monument, or in your most massive indoor space. Or in intimate rooms, all the more to frighten you. What large tentacles her spiders have!

Richard Long

Published: 
Esquire Art 2007 - 2010

The idea for Richard Long that the world was once undisturbed remains deep and powerful. A world before archaeology, before maps, before human sounds and shapes. A time when there was pure geology; when there were bird sounds and loose stones and forest and water, when history came in the form of clouds and rain, and social change came from a clear sky and the beginnings of a twisted pathway.